Wednesday, July 6, 2022

Winter management can reduce runoff losses

An AgResearch study in South Otago shows simple and low cost management techniques can significantly reduce overland flow and contaminant losses from winter forage crop paddocks.

Winter forage grazing paddocks are believed to contribute a disproportionately large part of annual farm nutrient and sediment losses as a result of intensive stock grazing on soils with high moisture content.

The Dairy NZ-funded catchment study, which is part of the Pastoral 21 programme, was led by AgResearch Invermay senior scientist Ross Monaghan.

The study was established at Telford Dairy Farm, Balclutha. It has been investigating the effect of grazing strategy on overland flow and water quality when paddock soil type, topography, drainage and stock management were taken into account.

It was thought that strategic grazing of cows in a winter forage crop paddock could reduce overland flow.

In the test, two different types of management were used. There was a control group with cows starting at the bottom of the hill then strip grazing up the hill. There was no back-fencing and the stream was unfenced and unprotected.

In the treatment catchment the cows entered at the top of the paddock then strip grazed in a downward direction. There was protection of the stream, back-fencing every four to five days and finally restricted grazing of the area surrounding the stream if conditions were suitable, effectively offering the last bite of winter when conditions allow.

“The strategic grazing method was a combination of protecting the critical source area (CSA) from stock by fencing and grazing the least risky areas first and grazing towards the higher risk areas.”

Ross Monaghan

AgResearch

Monaghan said the trial showed strategic grazing of dairy winter forage paddocks can considerably reduce volumes of overland flow.

“By reducing overland flow, the yields of sediment and nutrients carried in the flow were also reduced considerably,” he said.

“The strategic grazing method was a combination of protecting the critical source area (CSA) from stock by fencing and grazing the least risky areas first and grazing towards the higher risk areas. This effectively left the most vulnerable areas with minimal soil damage for as long as possible throughout the winter season.

“Protection of the CSA, gullies and areas prone to soil saturation is a key part to reducing overland flow and sediment loss. Grazing the CSA can still occur but only when soil conditions allow. These grazing managements are relatively simple to implement and low cost.”

The trial is continuing in 2013 with the paddocks being swapped to see if the differences between the control and treatment grazing strategies continue to be seen.

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