Wednesday, July 6, 2022

My Daily Digest: October 23, 2020

Consumer awareness impacts food production We’ve known for years now that consumers the world over are becoming more engaged with the stories behind the food they eat. They want to make sure it’s sustainable and that the land and people involved in its production are treated with respect.

That engagement is only increasing and not only are people more discerning about provenance, they’re widening their palates as well.

Lincoln University research shows 40% of Americans are planning to reduce meat consumption. That number rises to 60% in Canada.

People will still eat meat but they’ll become more picky. They’ll want the best, in smaller amounts. 

What does that mean for New Zealand? We need to take a look at the diversity of our food production systems and create an industry that produces a range of high-quality foods that are in harmony with the environment. Otherwise the world might pick some other food to eat.

 

Bryan Gibson

 

What’s driving new consumer trends?

Consumer awareness of the environmental impacts on food production is on the rise with demand for sustainable alternatives increasing and meeting that will require the constant attention of food producers, marketers and retailers.

 

Campaign to boost NZ’s glowing brand

New Zealand’s reputational trajectory as a safe haven, offering sustainable, quality food is being given an extra boost with NZ Trade and Enterprise’s (NZTE) latest marketing initiative.

 

Meat forecast raises questions

Forecasts that this year’s export lamb crop could be below 18 million for the first time has observers questioning what the impact will be.

 

Waterway fencing costs ‘unrealistic’

The Government appears to have underestimated the cost of fencing waterways to exclude farm livestock by about 50%.

 

New live export requirements announced

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has introduced new requirements for the safe transport of livestock by sea.

 

 

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