Wednesday, April 24, 2024

Low-carbon urea arrives in NZ

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Ravensdown says SABIC AN’s innovative manufacturing techniques for urea production have the potential to be game-changing for the global fertiliser industry.
Low-carbon urea being unloaded at Timaru Port.
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The first ever global shipment of low-carbon urea has arrived in New Zealand through Ravensdown, signalling a major step in the co-operative’s shift to a low-carbon future.

The 2700 tonnes of urea from Saudi Arabia make up the first international shipment of this product from SABIC Agri-Nutrients Company (SABIC AN).

The urea is created using carbon dioxide that is captured during the manufacture of ammonia instead of being released into the atmosphere. Ammonia is a base product for urea; it is combined with CO2 to create urea.

Testing, inspection and certification agency TÜV Rheinland has confirmed that the urea manufacturing process produces 64% less CO2 per tonne of urea than standard processing.

While it is manufactured using less carbon, the properties of the urea remain the same. 

This means emissions generated by the use of the urea on pasture or crops does not change and the low carbon advantage is captured as a Scope 3 (indirect) emission only.

Ravensdown chief executive Garry Diack says the collaboration with SABIC AN is key to supporting Ravensdown’s commitment to reduce carbon emissions by 50% by 2030.

“As pressure mounts for New Zealand farmers to lower greenhouse gas emissions from behind the farm gate, we are proudly working on their behalf right through the value chain to support them,” Diack says.

“SABIC AN’s innovative manufacturing techniques for urea production have the potential to be game-changing for the global fertiliser industry. We are excited to continue our valued collaboration with a company that has environmental goals and aspirations that are very aligned to our own.”

Ravensdown is discharging the shipment at Timaru Port.

“We continue to develop our 25-year relationship with SABIC AN, working together on future innovations to reduce the carbon footprint of the whole supply chain,” Diack says.

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